Can My Hair Grow Back if I Have Alopecia?

Millions of Americans have hair loss. The most common type of hair loss is androgenetic alopecia, or hereditary hair loss. Men and women can have it, but it’s far more common in men, and it accounts for some 95% of all male hair loss.

Whether you’ve noticed a slowly receding hairline in the mirror or you already have a large bald patch, you know that hair loss can be distressing, and you might wonder if there’s anything you can do to stop it. Growing hair back that’s fallen out isn’t always possible, but that doesn’t mean you have to accept baldness as part of life.

Oswald Mikell, MD, and our team at Dermatology Associates of the Lowcountry partner with men and women to fight hair loss and its effects. From diagnosis to treatment, we offer customized solutions to preserve the hair you have and encourage hair growth.

Identifying the cause of your alopecia

There are many possible causes of hair loss. The symptoms and treatments of hair loss vary depending on the cause, so seeking a professional diagnosis is the best way to get a treatment plan that addresses your needs.

Everyone experiences hair shedding, but if you’re losing more than 50-100 hairs per day, it could be due to an underlying condition. Traumatic or stressful events, illness, surgery, and pregnancy can all cause temporary hair loss.

But hair loss that continues — and gets worse — could indicate alopecia. The two most common forms of alopecia are alopecia areata and androgenetic alopecia.

Alopecia areata is an autoimmune condition that triggers hair loss in patches across the body. It can affect people of all ages and genders, but the good news is that hair often grows back on its own with the help of immune-suppressing medication.

Stopping hereditary hair loss in its tracks

Androgenetic alopecia is rooted in genetics, making it one of the more difficult types of hair loss to prevent. However, Dr. Mikell and our team offer several solutions that can help you fight back against hereditary hair loss.

Minoxidil

Minoxidil is an FDA-approved topical medication that’s designed to treat alopecia, including androgenetic alopecia. It’s available in foam and cream formulations, with different strengths to treat varying levels of alopecia.

The main goal of minoxidil treatment is to prevent additional hair loss. Hair regrowth can occur with minoxidil, but hair may fall out again if you stop using the medication.

Finasteride

Finasteride is an oral medication for alopecia. It’s FDA-approved to slow hereditary hair loss, and results last as long as you continue taking the medication. 

Both medications can be effective in stopping androgenetic alopecia from getting worse. Unfortunately, these treatment options don’t always help hair grow back if it’s already been lost, so it’s important to seek treatment as early as possible to preserve your hair. 

Your options for restoring lost hair

If you’re bothered by the appearance of large bald spots or severe hair loss, a hair transplant may be your best option to regain hair you’ve lost. Dr. Mikell has experience in a range of hair transplantation procedures, and he can help you determine if a hair transplant is right for you.

A hair transplant involves taking small grafts of scalp and hair from elsewhere on your head and moving them to areas without hair. Typically, Dr. Mikell uses hair from the back of your head and transplants the grafts to the crown and front.

Hair transplants are considered surgical procedures, and it could take up to two years before you see the full results of your transplant treatments.

Don’t let alopecia hinder your confidence. Partner with Dr. Mikell and our team to find a hair loss treatment that fits your needs. To learn more, book an appointment over the phone with Dermatology Associates of the Lowcountry today.

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