Mohs Surgery: Why You Want a Dermatologist Who's Experienced in Cosmetic Closure

The importance of proper closure in Mohs surgery.

Mohs surgery offers the highest cure rate available for many types of skin cancer. One of its advantages is its skin-sparing technique that effectively removes the cancer while preserving as much healthy tissue as possible. Compared to other surgical treatments, Mohs surgery often allows for better cosmetic results, faster healing, and less scarring.

Oswald Mikell, MD, who is a Board-Certified Dermatologist and Dermatologic Cosmetic Surgeon at Dermatology Associates of the Lowcountry in Hilton Head, South Carolina, recommends that men and women undergoing Mohs surgery see a Dermatologist who’s experienced in cosmetic closure. Cosmetic closure essentially means stitching up a wound in a way that provides aesthetically appealing results and minimal scarring.

Making your scar less visible

Curing your skin cancer is our top priority here at Dermatology Associates of the Lowcountry. But we also understand how your appearance can affect your self-esteem and confidence. That’s why your scar’s appearance comes in a close second on our list of priorities.

Because it’s often related to sun exposure, skin cancer tends to appear on the most visible and hardest-to-hide areas of your body, such as your face, ears, arms, and upper chest. Even with Mohs surgery, the scars left after the procedure can appear large, especially when they occur on your nose, lips, cheeks, or temples.  

As an experienced cosmetic surgeon, Dr. Mikell has significant training and skill in minimizing scarring following any surgical procedure, including Mohs. This expertise includes choosing the correct suture material, style, and placement for the best cosmetic results.

 He can, for instance, hide the small, precise stitches used to close the surgical wound within a nearby skinfold, wrinkle line, or anatomical structure, such as the curve of your nose.

Functionality matters, too

Beyond appearance, scar tissue that causes tightness in the region can interfere with the functionality of nearby structures. A poorly closed wound near an eye, for instance, can interfere with your ability to close your eye. And a scar near your mouth may prevent you from opening your mouth fully when you smile, speak, or eat.

The type of wound closure your surgeon chooses often will determine the way your scar heals. It’s often not enough to simply pull the edges of the wound together and stitch them up. An experienced cosmetic surgeon can select the best method for your circumstance.

Doing it right the first time

When your Dermatologist is experienced in cosmetic closure, you won’t need to visit a reconstructive or plastic surgeon after your Mohs surgery to minimize your scar. Some Dermatologists who don’t have advanced training, may close your wound and refer you to a plastic surgeon for further treatment. When you start with a Dermatologist who’s experienced at cosmetic closure, you won’t need to see anyone else.

If you need Mohs surgery and want the best in care, book an appointment online or over the phone with Dermatology Associates of the Lowcountry today.

 

Coming Next Month: Read all about who should have an annual skin check and other important skin cancer prevention steps.

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